Call for Chapters – Struggles for Recognition: Nonviolent Movements for Individual and Group Recognition

When individuals, peoples and states struggle for recognition conflict often ensues. How can those who study peace have a positive impact on these struggles? Are there ways of channeling the conflicts that surround attempts to gain political and social recognition into constructive and nonviolent resolution? What tools can philosophers bring to these struggles that might help bring about such constructive and nonviolent resolutions?

The CPP Board and David Ritchie (Mercer University) invite contributions on the topic of nonviolent/peaceful struggle for recognition for a forthcoming volume David is editing entitled: Struggles for Recognition: Nonviolent Movements for Individual and Group Recognition.

It is envisioned that this volume will serve as a venue for publication of some of the papers presented at the 2012 Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference (“Struggles for Recognition”) but we invite contributions from other scholars whose works investigate peaceful and nonviolent struggles for political, social, or religious recognition.

This collection of essays will be submitted to Rodopi’s Philosophy of Peace series, which has historically published proceedings of Concerned Philosophers for Peace conferences. All submissions should address questions of war, peace, and nonviolent social & political change from a pluralist perspective.

Anyone interested in contributing a chapter should submit a paper, suitably prepared for blind review, to David Ritchie at ritchie_d@law.mercer.edu no later than 1 May 2013. Papers should be roughly 6000 words, including notes and bibliography, and should use the author-date system of referencing.

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